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Home » Our Practice » From Dr. Faria » PIERCE FAMILY VISION GUIDE TO UNDERSTANDING MYOPIA PROGRESSION AND CONTROL

PIERCE FAMILY VISION GUIDE TO UNDERSTANDING MYOPIA PROGRESSION AND CONTROL

What Is Myopia (Near-Sightedness)?

Myopia is a condition where the light is focused in front of the retina when it enters the eye. This creates blurred vision when looking at objects far away.

What is Myopic Progression?

If the degree of myopia increases over time, we define this as myopic progression. It is influenced both by the size of the eyeball (axial length) and the focusing structures of the eye (the cornea and the lens). This not only means stronger and thicker glasses, but also an increase in the risk of eye disease later in life.

What is Myopia Management?

Myopia management involves employing different techniques to influence the size of the eyeball and slow the rate at which it grows. This is particularly important in children, as it is during this period that the greatest degree of change can happen and when myopia management can be most effective.

Can Myopia be cured?

Unfortunately, there is no “cure” for myopia currently. However we are very pleased to be able to now offer some very effective measures to dramatically slow myopic changes which were unavailable to previous generations.

Will Myopia Management stop myopic changes entirely?

There is no guarantee that employing myopia management will completely stop myopic changes. During treatment, the prescription is closely monitored, and is adapted if the treatment is not giving the intended effect. The principal behind myopia management is slowing the rate of change to a point where minimal prescription changes are seen each year.

4 Different Methods are available for Myopia Control

Intervention Brief Description

Specialty Spectacle Lenses (Stellest or Miyosmart Lenses)


Available at PFV

Specialty spectacle lenses use DIMS technology (Defocused Incorporated Multiple Segments). This provides a child with clear vision at distance and near while simultaneously placing areas of defocus on the back surface of the eye. The areas of defocus are created by many small segments interspersed throughout the glass’s lens. These areas of defocus tell the brain to stop the growth of the eye, reducing the rate of myopic progression.

Soft Specialty Contact Lenses (MiSight)

Available at PFV

Speciality contact lens using ActivControl technology (peripheral myopic defocus zones). Provides clear vision distance and near while simultaneously placing areas of defocus on the back surface of the eye. The areas of defocus are created by rings as opposed to multiple segments as in DIMS lenses. These areas of defocus tell the brain to stop the growth of the eye, reducing the rate of myopic progression.

Ortho-Keratology

We refer outside our practice for this

Specialty hard contact lenses using reverse geometry to temporarily reshape the front surface of the eye. These lenses are worn overnight and taken out in the morning. The nightly reshaping gives children clear vision distance and near throughout the day, while simultaneously providing peripheral areas of myopic defocus as a byproduct. These areas of defocus tell the brain to stop the growth of the eye, reducing the rate of myopic progression.

Atropine Eye Drops

Available at PFV

Atropine eye drops affect both pupil size and the muscles acting on the focusing structure in the eye. In very low doses, it has been shown to reduce the rate of myopic progression while minimally affecting the pupil size and focussing. Due to the near blur associated with these drops, a pair of glasses that helps with distance and near focus is prescribed.

Please ask our optometrists and/or our staff if you have any further questions. More information is also available at: https://www.piercefamilyvision.com/eye-care-services/myopia-management/